IBM unveils world's smallest PC that only cost Rs 7 to manufacture

The smallest and cheapest PC ever built.

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IBM has showcased the world's smallest computer, it is so small that you'll need a microscope to look at them properly. Each PC is smaller than a grain of salt measuring a mere 1mm by 1mm in size. The company showcased the smallest computer at its Think 2018 conference. According to IBM the computer costs under 2 cents to manufacture which is less than Rs 7 per unit and comprises of one million transistors each.

 
IBM unveils world's smallest PC that only cost Rs 7 to manufacture

How efficient?

How efficient?

The company also claims that this grain-sized computer can perform as fast as a 1990s PC. Though the speed claim isn't that impressive considering the latest smartphones and PC perform way faster, the analysts still believe this is a good speed for PC that is so small in size.

Future-ready

Future-ready

Not just that, each one of these PCs is blockchain-enabled and can come in handy for cryptocurrency purposes, and will support blockchain apps in the coming days. The company envisions that these PC will be a norm in next five years and will be incorporated in everyday electronics objects and will also play a key role in the Internet of Things, shipment tracking and many more.

"These technologies pave the way for new solutions that tackle food safety, the authenticity of manufactured components, genetically modified products, identification of counterfeit objects and provenance of luxury goods," said Arvind Krishna, head of research, IBM.

Other tiny things
 

Other tiny things

This isn't the first time we have seen a small package offering big functionality. Earlier, Zanco launched the smallest phone in the world - Tiny T1. It is smaller than a coin and has 2G functionality. It sports a 12.5mm OLED display and 32GB of internal storage. It supports a Nano SIM and Micro USB charging.

British scientists managed to create the world's smallest Christmas card which was so small that over 200 million could fit into a standard postage stamp. The card measures only measure 15 x 20 micrometers.

"We are using the tools that created the card to accurately measure the thickness of extremely small features in materials, helping to unlock new battery and semiconductor technologies. It's a genuinely exciting development." NPL's Dr David Cox said.

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