Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster is farthest it'll ever be from the Sun

Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster is going places.

    Since its launch on February 6, Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster and its Starman have been moving away from the Sun. Now, according to Where is Roadster? website, the car has reached its first apogee from the Sun at a distance of 1.66 Astronomical Units. 

    Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster is farthest it'll ever be from the Sun

     

    Ben Pearson, who runs the site, says the car's position should be accurate to better than a day, but there's no possible way to know for sure. The data on the Tesla's orbit comes from NASA, while ground telescopes were used for the initial six weeks for tracking.

    "There haven't been any updates since towards the end of March," Pearson told Ars Technica "Still, there's no reason to suspect it would be more than a little off target."
    After few months of the takeoff, only Hubble Space Telescope is capable of tracking the Tesla Roadster. This instrument can see down to the 30th magnitude, which is a measure of an object's brightness.

    Such a magnitude is extremely high, about 1 billion times more so than an object visible to the naked eye. Seeing the Roadster at its present distance, just outside the orbit of Mars, is similar to Hubble spying a 15km-wide lump of rock in the Kuiper Belt, outside Neptune's orbit.

    Hubble won't be spending any more time on finding the Roadster. "Hubble orbits are precious and highly competed for, and so it would be a waste of scientific time to devote the resources to look at it," said Ray Villard, news director for the Space Telescope Science Institute, told Ars.

    The images show highlights in Starman's expected orbit that also includes a pass within 0.05 AU of mars in October 2020. It will pass close to the Earth in November 2020. This will also allow the ground-based telescopes to observe the Roadster again.

    Besides, NASA and the European Space Agency recently came together to release a video about astronauts' life at the International Space Station (ISS). But this time the video was shot in the 8K ultra-high definition. The Helium 8K camera from RED was used for the shooting of the video.

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