NASA's Hubble snaps spectacular stars collision forming super-galaxy

    NASA Hubble Telescope captures another breathtaking view.

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    As we know, galaxies constantly move, pulled around by the gravity of bigger galaxies. When two or more galaxies approach each other, it results in either massive destruction or they form a super-galaxy.

    NASA's Hubble snaps spectacular stars collision forming super-galaxy

     

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has snapped one such incident. The telescope captured the NGC 6052 in the constellation of Hercules, where two galaxies formed a super-galaxy. These galaxies were discovered in 1784 by William Herschel. John Louis Emil Dreyer described NGC 6052 as "faint, pretty large, irregularly round."

    Later it was found that there are two galaxies that move in a pair which were drawn together millions of years ago. As they came closer, gravitational pull changed their trajectories to form a shape that they now show.

    Unlike other galaxy collision where one of the galaxies is demolished, this pair is merging to form a single stable galaxy. That won't be the case with our galaxy - the Milky Way when it collides with the Large Magellanic Cloud or the nearby Andromeda galaxy in billions of years' time. The milky way might be completely destroyed after the collision.

    Hubble previously captured the NGC 6052 in 2015. The previous image was captured with the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), while the latest picture is the product of the newer Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3).

    Read More About: nasa space science news
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