Scientist might have uncovered the dark energy mystery with new universe model

The new model also shows new ways to test the string theory.

    A team of researchers has come with a new model that represents the universe -- one that might actually solve the enigma of dark energy. The study, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, gives us a new structural concept of a universe that moves with a bubble that's expanding in an additional dimension. It has been a known fact for almost past 20 years that the universe is expanding at a very high rate, said researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden.

    Scientist might have uncovered the dark energy mystery

     

    The explanation is the "dark energy" that spreads it throughout, forcing it to expand. To understand the basic nature of dark energy is one the most important enigmas of Physics. It is widely believed that the string theory will be able to crack this mystery. The string theory states that all matter has tiny, vibrating "stringlike" entities. But, the theory requires more spatial dimensions than the three we already know of.

    For the past 15 years, using string theory, a lot of models have been presented to explain the rise of dark energy. However, none of them were convincing enough and were badly criticized. Besides, many researchers have said that none of the models proposed previously are workable.

    The new model shows how the universe and dark energy ride on the expanding bubble moving towards an extra dimension. The researchers said that the universe is accommodated on the edge of this expanding bubble.

    The new model also suggests that all the existing matter in the universe corresponds to the ends of strings that also extend out to another dimension, the researchers said. The researchers explained that expanding bubbles like these fall in line with the string theory. It is likely that there are many more bubbles out there which correspond to other universes. The new model gives a fresh picture of how the universe was created, and also paved way for new ways to test the string theory.

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